2014: The Year of Mobile Marketing

2014: The Year of Mobile Marketing


While a company used to be considered cutting-edge for having a blog and some social media accounts, today these avenues are customary—and expected—for everybody. To remain truly bleeding-edge, businesses need to raise the bar when it comes to their marketing strategy and focus on mobile marketing.

The fact is, mobile activity is quickly becoming an ingrained behavior for all types of people. Just consider the following statistics shared in an infographic by Polish Marketing firm Super Monitoring:

  • More than 2 billion mobile devices were shipped globally in 2013
  • 50% of people now use mobile as either their primary or exclusive means of going online
  • Global mobile traffic now accounts for 15% of all Internet traffic; mobile-based searches make up 25% of all search queries, and mobile web adoption is eight times faster than web adoption was in the 1990s and early 2000s

Mobile marketing is a powerful tool in your marketing belt. In fact, your team is probably already wondering how to better leverage it in 2014.

Here are a few trends to keep in mind:

It’s All about Personalization

While in the past it was fine to mass market—or splatter one central marketing message across billboards, print publications, and multimedia platforms—today is the age of personalization and customization. Mass marketing no longer works, as consumers crave tailored pitches.

There are a variety of ways to demonstrate to your customers that you value their loyalty. For example, your marketing team can embrace tactics such as:

Segmented marketing – divide and categorize your distribution lists so that certain groups receive specific messages, promotions, and value-adds

Search engine advertising – offer relevant advertisements or services based on search query behavior of consumers

Qualitative surveys – solicit feedback from your target audience to find out which messages resonate with them and what types of communications they would like to receive more often

Shorter Content Will Dominate

With the surge in mobile, marketers understand the importance of shortening marketing copy and optimizing for mobile consumption. Nowadays, 29% of all emails are opened on mobile phones and 10% on tablets, according to Super Monitoring’s infographic.

These statistics prove that content has to be pithy, original, and impactful. No longer do marketers have a four-page spread in a magazine to sell a product offering and incite change. Conversely, they are now marketing to a group of consumers who have limited attention spans and want immediate gratification with each message.

An effective mobile marketing strategy includes:

  • Compelling, witty subject lines that drive open rates
  • Succinct body copy that require little scrolling
  • Images and videos that are of the appropriate width and pixilation and are optimized for mobile
  • Large buttons for calls to actions
  • Legible text, images, and videos

Short-form content is in and long-form copy is out, so it’s up to you to challenge your marketing team to say more with fewer words and to drive action from the very first scroll.

Save Some Content for the Second Screen

At the end of the day your mobile marketing message has to be forceful enough to drive action but digestible enough to be consumed across a very small device. Therefore, in 2014 marketers need to consider the power of the second screen—piquing the reader’s interest just enough with the original message to get them to pull up secondary content on an additional screen.

As a marketer, before hitting the “send” button, ask yourself:

  • Are the basics there with your message?
  • Is your copy truly a teaser? Does it give your audience just enough to push the “read more” button and warrant the need for a second screen?
  • Is your message simple yet compelling? Will your readers be overwhelmed with too much text, excessive flash, and an overabundance of multimedia elements?
  • Can any part of the message be omitted and left for a secondary link?

The beauty of mobile is that you can rely on less verbiage to tell the same tale. So choose your words wisely, keep it simple, and invite your audience to engage further with your brand by clicking on external links.

While a company used to be considered cutting-edge for having a blog and some social media accounts, today these avenues are customary—and expected—for everybody. To remain truly bleeding-edge, businesses need to raise the bar when it comes to their marketing strategy and focus on mobile marketing.

The fact is, mobile activity is quickly becoming an ingrained behavior for all types of people. Just consider the following statistics shared in an infographic by Polish Marketing firm Super Monitoring:

  • More than 2 billion mobile devices were shipped globally in 2013
  • 50% of people now use mobile as either their primary or exclusive means of going online
  • Global mobile traffic now accounts for 15% of all Internet traffic; mobile-based searches make up 25% of all search queries, and mobile web adoption is eight times faster than web adoption was in the 1990s and early 2000s

Mobile marketing is a powerful tool in your marketing belt. In fact, your team is probably already wondering how to better leverage it in 2014.

Here are a few trends to keep in mind:

It’s All about Personalization

While in the past it was fine to mass market—or splatter one central marketing message across billboards, print publications, and multimedia platforms—today is the age of personalization and customization. Mass marketing no longer works, as consumers crave tailored pitches.

There are a variety of ways to demonstrate to your customers that you value their loyalty. For example, your marketing team can embrace tactics such as:

Segmented marketing – divide and categorize your distribution lists so that certain groups receive specific messages, promotions, and value-adds

Search engine advertising – offer relevant advertisements or services based on search query behavior of consumers

Qualitative surveys – solicit feedback from your target audience to find out which messages resonate with them and what types of communications they would like to receive more often

Shorter Content Will Dominate

With the surge in mobile, marketers understand the importance of shortening marketing copy and optimizing for mobile consumption. Nowadays, 29% of all emails are opened on mobile phones and 10% on tablets, according to Super Monitoring’s infographic.

These statistics prove that content has to be pithy, original, and impactful. No longer do marketers have a four-page spread in a magazine to sell a product offering and incite change. Conversely, they are now marketing to a group of consumers who have limited attention spans and want immediate gratification with each message.

An effective mobile marketing strategy includes:

  • Compelling, witty subject lines that drive open rates
  • Succinct body copy that require little scrolling
  • Images and videos that are of the appropriate width and pixilation and are optimized for mobile
  • Large buttons for calls to actions
  • Legible text, images, and videos

Short-form content is in and long-form copy is out, so it’s up to you to challenge your marketing team to say more with fewer words and to drive action from the very first scroll.

Save Some Content for the Second Screen

At the end of the day your mobile marketing message has to be forceful enough to drive action but digestible enough to be consumed across a very small device. Therefore, in 2014 marketers need to consider the power of the second screen—piquing the reader’s interest just enough with the original message to get them to pull up secondary content on an additional screen.

As a marketer, before hitting the “send” button, ask yourself:

  • Are the basics there with your message?
  • Is your copy truly a teaser? Does it give your audience just enough to push the “read more” button and warrant the need for a second screen?
  • Is your message simple yet compelling? Will your readers be overwhelmed with too much text, excessive flash, and an overabundance of multimedia elements?
  • Can any part of the message be omitted and left for a secondary link?

The beauty of mobile is that you can rely on less verbiage to tell the same tale. So choose your words wisely, keep it simple, and invite your audience to engage further with your brand by clicking on external links.

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