Show Not Tell: Put 'Why' Back into Your Sales Strategy

Show Not Tell: Put 'Why' Back into Your Sales Strategy

Show not tell

Today’s customers have more power than ever before. With online reviews, social networks, and blogging platforms, it’s easy to know more about a company’s offerings than a seasoned salesperson. In fact, buyers may be anywhere from two-thirds to 90% of the way through their buying period before they reach a salesperson, in large part due to the vast amount of information provided online, according to Forrester Research.

In a world where buyers are in the driver’s seat, it’s important for salespeople to show customers why a product or service is in their best interest instead of telling them what that product or service does. In other words, the why is more important than the what.

Focusing on the "Why"

The typical sales pitch is often filled with common statements like “We offer the most reliable product on the market” or “Our service is guaranteed to save you money.” While these statements may get customers past the initial prospecting stage, it won’t push them much further. The fact is, your customers have already done their homework and likely sized you up against the competition. However, what they don’t know are the cold hard numbers, the proven facts, and the market research – which is where your job as a salesperson comes in.

While most people don’t like a person who name drops, your customers do. Potential customers want to know about your current customer base, especially noteworthy clientele. After all, you are the company you keep. Instead of telling prospective clients that your company is a well-known trusted industry expert, show them by divulging a few of your most impressive clients.

Moreover, don’t just tell prospective clients that you have the best customer service team. Instead, demonstrate that commitment to customer service by explaining that the department has won two industry awards for excellent service. These types of sales messages and statements give customers information they may not have known otherwise, not to mention a clear reason as to why to partner with your company.

The same sales strategy should be applied when describing products. The traditional sales strategy tells a customer what the product is or does, forcing them to think how that applies to his or her own situation or needs. However, the right sales strategy will illustrate how a product or service solves a customer’s current concerns.

By placing yourself in customers’ shoes, tailor your sales strategy to address their biggest pain points. For example, if a prospective client is most concerned with cutting costs, back your pitch up with real numbers instead of simply stating that your product can save money. Maybe a recent study shows that your product saves customers 30% in overall annual costs or 50% over time. If you want to increase sales, your strategy should be jam-packed with hard hitting numbers that back up blanketed statements.

Show not tell

Today’s customers have more power than ever before. With online reviews, social networks, and blogging platforms, it’s easy to know more about a company’s offerings than a seasoned salesperson. In fact, buyers may be anywhere from two-thirds to 90% of the way through their buying period before they reach a salesperson, in large part due to the vast amount of information provided online, according to Forrester Research.

In a world where buyers are in the driver’s seat, it’s important for salespeople to show customers why a product or service is in their best interest instead of telling them what that product or service does. In other words, the why is more important than the what.

Focusing on the "Why"

The typical sales pitch is often filled with common statements like “We offer the most reliable product on the market” or “Our service is guaranteed to save you money.” While these statements may get customers past the initial prospecting stage, it won’t push them much further. The fact is, your customers have already done their homework and likely sized you up against the competition. However, what they don’t know are the cold hard numbers, the proven facts, and the market research – which is where your job as a salesperson comes in.

While most people don’t like a person who name drops, your customers do. Potential customers want to know about your current customer base, especially noteworthy clientele. After all, you are the company you keep. Instead of telling prospective clients that your company is a well-known trusted industry expert, show them by divulging a few of your most impressive clients.

Moreover, don’t just tell prospective clients that you have the best customer service team. Instead, demonstrate that commitment to customer service by explaining that the department has won two industry awards for excellent service. These types of sales messages and statements give customers information they may not have known otherwise, not to mention a clear reason as to why to partner with your company.

The same sales strategy should be applied when describing products. The traditional sales strategy tells a customer what the product is or does, forcing them to think how that applies to his or her own situation or needs. However, the right sales strategy will illustrate how a product or service solves a customer’s current concerns.

By placing yourself in customers’ shoes, tailor your sales strategy to address their biggest pain points. For example, if a prospective client is most concerned with cutting costs, back your pitch up with real numbers instead of simply stating that your product can save money. Maybe a recent study shows that your product saves customers 30% in overall annual costs or 50% over time. If you want to increase sales, your strategy should be jam-packed with hard hitting numbers that back up blanketed statements.

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